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What are the different types of heritage registration?

Heritage Property

What are the different types of heritage registration?

The Government of Nova Scotia’s Heritage Property Act allows for different types of property registration based upon the property’s historical associations.

For example, if a local business and its owner are known for contributing to the establishment of a town’s economy, the property may have heritage value as a registered municipal heritage property. However, if the same property affected the industrial economy of the province, it may also have strong heritage value as a registered provincial heritage property.

In either case, the property’s historical associations help determine its designation once registered under the act. It should be noted that the different designations do not represent different levels of heritage value.

 

Types of Heritage Registration:

Individual registered provincial heritage properties can occur when they are deemed to have a provincial level of heritage value. Heritage value may include architecture, historical associations or settings, and provides important representations of Nova Scotia’s history.

A registered provincial streetscape can occur when a grouping of properties (collectively) is deemed to have provincial heritage value. These properties must all be visible from one vantage point.

A registered provincial public-building interior can occur when the character-defining elements of a publicly accessible building interior owned by the Government of the Province is deemed to have provincial heritage value.

A provincial cultural landscape can occur when a distinct geographical area or property uniquely representing the combined work of nature and of people is deemed to have provincial heritage value.

Individual registered municipal heritage properties can occur when properties are deemed to have a local or community level of heritage value. Heritage value may include architecture, historical associations, or settings and provide important representations of municipality’s history.

A registered municipal streetscape can occur when a grouping of properties (collectively) is deemed to have local or community heritage value. These properties must all be visible from one vantage point.

A registered municipal heritage conservation district can occur when a large area of urban or rural properties (collectively) is deemed to have a local or community level of heritage value. The properties contained within the district’s boundaries typically cannot be entirely seen from one vantage point. All districts are developed by the community for the community and have their own bylaw and plan for administrations.

A registered municipal public-building interior can occur when the character-defining elements of a publicly accessible building interior owned by the municipality is deemed to have municipal heritage value.

A municipal cultural landscape can occur when a distinct geographical area or property uniquely representing the combined work of nature and of people is deemed to have municipal heritage value.

 

 

Heritage is that which society inherits from previous generations and deems worthy of taking special measures to preserve for future generations