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A Titanic Landmark

A Titanic Landmark

If you live in Halifax, chances are you may recognize the George Wright House.

Located on the prominent corner of Young Avenue and Inglis Street in the south end, this historic home is valued as an architectural landmark and for its association with George Wright and his tragic death.

By the end of the 1890s, George Wright had become a wealthy and prominent member of Halifax society. He travelled the world and published an international trade directory. In 1902 he commissioned architect James Dumaresq to design his residence. It was completed a year later at a cost in excess of $5000. This home, that we see today, is a remarkable example of the Queen Anne Revival style.

In 1912, Wright travelled to England, and booked return passage on the RMS Titanic. He became one of the many casualties of the shocking tragedy that commemorates its 100th anniversary on April 15, 2012.

In his will, Wright left $226,000 to worthy causes and his house on Young Avenue to the Council of Women. The Council continues to hold meetings in the house today.

The George Wright House is one of the more important houses in Nova Scotia dating from the early 1900s – a landmark notable for its period architecture and storied history.

 

For more information see:

Maritime Museum of the Atlantic

Nova Scotia Archives RMS Titanic Resource

 

 

The George Wright House is one of the more important houses in Nova Scotia dating from the early 1900s – a landmark notable for its period architecture and storied history.