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Changes to the Heritage Property Act

Nova Scotia will take a more modern and efficient approach to registering heritage properties with changes to the Heritage Property Act, which were introduced on November 13, 2015.

"These amendments will improve the Heritage Property Act and will help us continue to protect important pieces of our heritage," said Communities, Culture and Heritage Minister Tony Ince. "They align with government's efforts to streamline regulation and provide efficient government service."

Changes will allow cultural landscapes whose unique heritage value is based on how nature and humans have affected the landscape to be designated as a type of municipal heritage property. Registration processes and timelines will also be streamlined.

"Our heritage, including our built heritage, has helped shape who we are as Nova Scotians," said Ken Langille, chair of the Advisory Council on Heritage Property. "Municipalities and heritage property owners will be able to accomplish their work more efficiently with this clarity from the province."

The province will adopt nationally accepted conservation standards and guidelines to ensure clarity and a consistent approach to preservation of heritage properties.

To modernize government's approach and make it consistent with other provinces, the minister of Communities, Culture and Heritage will now have the authority to consider applications to alter a registered provincial heritage property, rather than going to Executive Council to do so.

Nova Scotia now has 287 registered provincial heritage properties, including the most recent, Beinn Bhreagh Hall in Baddeck. There are more than 1,500 municipally registered properties.

The changes reflect consultation with municipalities and organizations involved in heritage preservation. The new bill, as well as explanatory text, can be viewed on the Nova Scotia Legislature website, under Heritage Property Act.

 

Our heritage, including our built heritage, has helped shape who we are as Nova Scotians. Municipalities and heritage property owners will be able to accomplish their work more efficiently with this clarity from the province.