Feature Stories

Even though Nova Scotia is Canada’s second smallest province, our people share a rich tapestry of culture and heritage that shapes who we are and where we live. Today, our sheltered bays and inlets continue to welcome newcomers to our shores, solidifying our enviable reputation for hospitality and acceptance of difference. Our legacy of migration can be found in our physical surroundings; in our museums, archives and libraries; in our communities; and in the varied and dynamic nature of our cultural expression. Influenced by the beauty of the land, captivated by a relationship with the sea, and inspired by the desire to not only preserve our roots, but also, invite new roots to grow, Nova Scotians are enriched by who we were and who we have yet to become.

October is Mi’kmaq History Month in Nova Scotia. The goal of the month is to help Nova Scotians build awareness of Mi’kmaq history and heritage, and to increase understanding of the province’s rich Mi’kmaq culture.
For the first time ever, Nova Scotians will have a clear understanding of the economic importance of the culture sector, thanks to the Culture Satellite Account.
From 2014 to 2018, nations, communities and individuals across the world will remember those who fought and died in the First World War. Here in Nova Scotia, recognition of this important centenary has already begun.
In addition to being the 130th anniversary of the Acadian flag, August 15, 2014, also coincides with the fifth World Acadian Congress.
Nova Scotia's public libraries are offering a variety of reading programs for youth this summer.

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